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Key Professional Appointments

Associate Professor, Education Policy, Organization and Leadership, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Awards, Honors, Associations

Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award, College of Education, 2020

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Publications

Davila, L. T. (2020). Multilingual Interactions and Learning in High School ESL Classrooms. TESOL Quarterly, 54(1), 30-55. https://doi.org/10.1002/tesq.536  link >

Dávila, L. T., & Linares, R. E. (2020). English as a second language teachers’ perceptions of care in an anti-immigrant climate. International Multilingual Research Journal. https://doi.org/10.1080/19313152.2020.1747164  link >

T. Dávila, L., & Bunar, N. (2020). Translanguaging through an advocacy lens: The roles of multilingual classroom assistants in Sweden. European Journal of Applied Linguistics, 8(1), 107-126. https://doi.org/10.1515/eujal-2019-0012  link >

Davila, L. T. (2019). Multilingualism and identity: articulating ‘African-ness’ in an American high school. Race Ethnicity and Education, 22(5), 634-646. https://doi.org/10.1080/13613324.2018.1424709  link >

Dávila, L. T. (2019). J'aime to be Funny!”: Humor, Learning, and Identity Construction in High School English as a Second Language Classrooms. Modern Language Journal, 103(2), 502-514. https://doi.org/10.1111/modl.12557  link >

Kolano, L. Q., & Davila, L. T. (2019). Transformative Learning of Refugee Girls Within a Community Youth Organization Serving Southeast Asians in North Carolina. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 33(1), 119-133. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2018.1531447  link >

Sanders-Smith, S. C., & Dávila, L. T. (2019). Progressive practice and translanguaging: Supporting multilingualism in a Hong Kong preschool. Bilingual Research Journal, 42(3), 275-290. https://doi.org/10.1080/15235882.2019.1624281  link >

Thorstensson Dávila, L. (2018). The pivotal and peripheral roles of bilingual classroom assistants at a Swedish elementary school. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 21(8), 956-967. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2016.1224224  link >

Dávila, L. T. (2017). Ecologies of Heritage Language Learning in a Multilingual Swedish School. Journal of Language, Identity and Education, 16(6), 395-407. https://doi.org/10.1080/15348458.2017.1385025  link >

Dávila, L. T., Kolano, L. Q., & Coffey, H. (2017). Negotiating Co-Teaching Identities in Multilingual High School Classrooms. NABE Journal of Research and Practice, 8(1), 28-43. https://doi.org/10.1080/26390043.2017.12067794  link >

Thorstensson Davila, L. S. (2017). Newly arrived immigrant youth in Sweden negotiate identity, language & literacy. System, 67, 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2017.04.001  link >

T. Dávila, L. (2015). “Dare I Ask?”: Eliciting Prior Knowledge and Its Implications for Teaching and Learning. TESL-EJ, 19(2).

Thorstensson Davila, L. S. (2015). Diaspora literacies: An exploration of what reading means to young African immigrant women. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 58(8), 641-649. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaal.414  link >

Davila, L. T. (2014). Performing Allegiance: An Adolescent Refugee's Construction of Patriotism in JROCT. Educational Studies, 50(5), 447-463. https://doi.org/10.1080/00131946.2014.943893  link >

Kolano, L. Q., T. Dávila, L., LaChance, J., & Coffey, H. (2014). Multicultural Teacher Education: Why Teachers Say It Matters in Preparing Them for English Language Learners. The CATESOL Journal, 25(1), 41-65.

Thorstensson Davila, L. S. (2014). Representing Refugee Youth in Qualitative Research: Questions of Ethics, Language and Authenticity. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education, 8(1), 21-31. https://doi.org/10.1080/15595692.2013.803466  link >

Coffey, H., Davila, L., & Kolano, L. (2013). Understanding Dialect and Developing Critical Literacy with English Language Learners. Multicultural Learning and Teaching, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.1515/mlt-2012-0006  link >

Dávila, L. T. (2012). ‘For Them it's Sink or Swim’: Refugee Students and the Dynamics of Migration, and (Dis)Placement in School. Power and Education, 4(2), 139-149. https://doi.org/10.2304/power.2012.4.2.139  link >

Rong, X. L., Dávila, L. T., & Hilburn, J. (2011). Working with Immigrant Children of “Undocumented” and “Mixed” Families. In B. S. Fennimore, & A. L. Goodwin (Eds.), Promoting Social Justice for Young Children (pp. 93-109). (Educating the Young Child; Vol. 3). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0570-8_9  link >

T. Dávila, L. (2011). “Good Kids,” but “Poor Students”: The Academic Identities of Refugee High School Students From Vietnam’s Central Highlands. In X. L. Rong, & R. Endo (Eds.), Asian American Education: Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages (Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans). Information Age Publishing Inc..

Dávila, L. T. (2008). Language and Opportunity in the “Land of Opportunity”: Latina Immigrants’ Reflections on Language Learning and Professional Mobility. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, 7(4), 356-370. https://doi.org/10.1177/1538192708321652  link >

Thorstensson, L. (2001). This Business of Internationalization: The Academic Experiences of 6 Asian MBA International Students at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. Journal of Studies in International Education, 5(4), 317-340. https://doi.org/10.1177/102831530154004  link >

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Courses

Linguistics for Classrm Teach (CI 507) Intensive examination of problems and trends in the subject fields.

Global Migration and Education (EPOL 420) This course will integrate contemporary global and comparative perspectives on the study of migration and formal education at the preschool, primary and secondary (P-12) levels. Students will critically examine how institutions of education around the world are shaped by migration, as well as how migrant students and their families interface with educational institutions in resettlement contexts. Specific topics will include: policy responses, curricular approaches, language(s) of instruction, teacher and learner identities, and community-school dynamics.

Global Migration and Education (EPOL 435) This course will integrate contemporary global and comparative perspectives on the study of migration and formal education at the preschool, primary and secondary (P-12) levels. Students will critically examine how institutions of education around the world are shaped by migration, as well as how migrant students and their families interface with educational institutions in resettlement contexts. Specific topics will include: policy responses, curricular approaches, language(s) of instruction, teacher and learner identities, and community-school dynamics.

Methods of Educational Inquiry (EPOL 550)

General Field Research Seminar (EPOL 586) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their general field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the general field literature, which will become part of their dissertation. This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the General Field Qualifying Examination.

Special Field Research Seminar (EPOL 587) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their special field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the special field literature, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Special Field Qualifying Examination.

ONL Discourse Analysis (EPOL 590) Discourse Analysis is a method of qualitative inquiry that involves the interpreting meaning in language in relation to social contexts and processes. In this course students will gain an understanding of major theoretical and methodological approaches to doing discourse analysis in educational research (e.g., through analysis of face-to-face or online classroom talk and interaction, or published policy documents). Course assignments will provide students with opportunities to develop tools for conducting research using discourse analytic methods. This is an advanced qualitative methods course. Students need to have taken an introductory qualitative methods course prior to this one.

Discourse Analysis (EPOL 590) Discourse Analysis is a method of qualitative inquiry that involves the interpreting meaning in language in relation to social contexts and processes. In this course students will gain an understanding of major theoretical and methodological approaches to doing discourse analysis in educational research (e.g., through analysis of face-to-face or online classroom talk and interaction, or published policy documents). Course assignments will provide students with opportunities to develop tools for conducting research using discourse analytic methods. This is an advanced qualitative methods course. Students need to have taken an introductory qualitative methods course prior to this one.

Thesis Seminar (EPOL 591) Designed to take students through the entire process of proposal development, this course is intended for masters or doctoral students who are ready to prepare a thesis or dissertation proposal. Students will learn to use a systematic and comprehensive approach to develop the research proposal and how each step in the research process is related.

Independent Study (EPOL 595) Offers opportunity and challenge of self-directive, independent study; develops the individual's ability as an independent student and enables the student to pursue needed study in a field in which appropriate courses are not being offered during a given term.

Thesis Research (EPOL 599) Individual direction of research and thesis writing.

Global Migration & Education (EPS 500) Seminar on topics not treated by regularly scheduled courses; requests for initiation may be made by students or faculty members. This course will integrate contemporary global and comparative perspectives on the study of migration and formal education at the preschool, primary and secondary (P-12) levels. Students will critically examine how institutions of education around the world are shaped by migration, as well as how migrant students and their families interface with educational institutions in resettlement contexts. Specific topics will include: policy responses, curricular approaches, language(s) of instruction, teacher and learner identities, and community-school dynamics.

Language, Identity & Education (EPS 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education.

ONL Discourse Analysis (EPS 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education. 47804 Section FR1 Topic: Schoolbased Project in Internationalization

Discourse Analysis (EPS 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education.

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Associate Professor, Education Policy, Organization and Leadership

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Education Building
1310 S. Sixth St.
Champaign, IL 61820

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