by bmbarnet@illinois.edu (Professor Bernice Barnett) / Dec 6, 2016, 11:45 AM

Spring 2017 EPS 421: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Families Course

Tuesday, 1-2:50pm; Room 323, Education Bldg

Professor: Dr. Bernice Barnett (bmbarnet@illinois.edu)

4 Hours Credit Graduate section A:

EPS 421: #47206     SOC 421: #47210    HDFS 424: #47209   AFRO 421: #47208

3 Hours Undergraduate section B:

EPS #33093    SOC 421 #33098    HDFS 424 #33097    AFRO 421 #33095

Course Description:

This combined Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate (Juniors, Seniors only) 400-level social foundations course is a sociological examination of diversity in racial-ethnic families, which are the foundations of education. Understanding how race, gender, class, ethnicity, disability, sexuality, language, immigrant status, and other stratifying relations in society influence diversity in families is important, especially for teacher preparation and educational policies because families generally are the first agents of education, learning, and socialization of children before they enter schools because family background is related to school achievement. In addition, relationships among students/parents/families in homes and teachers/administrators/staff in classrooms/schools/colleges/universities can impact educational achievement. Moreover, local state, regional, and global population demographic are changing racially/ethnically; therefore,  families, educators, the public, and policymakers in schools, colleges, and major societal institutions need to be prepared for the racial-ethnic demographic shifts in the US. The primary objectives of this social foundational course are: (1) to introduce, survey, and evaluate major sociological theories, approaches, concepts, research, questions, debates, issues, and data on diversity in  racial ethnic families; (2) to develop/strengthen research and analytical skills, especially by critically examining the reality vs. the images, ideals and myths about “typical” racial-ethnic minority and majority families and the social constructions of families as  “deviate” vs ”normal;” (3) to foster an awareness and understanding of dimensions/patterns of diversity both across and within  racial ethnic families in the U.S. and the basis of racial ethnic diversity globally; (4) to consider how families are interconnected to education, economy, politics, religion, and other social institutions; (5) to examine how families are agents of education and how children from diverse family backgrounds with varying home cultures, resources, compositions, and environments come of age, grow up, develop identities, experience schooling, achieve in education, react to racial-ethnic differences/similarities, and live/learn/work cooperatively and democratically in a multiracial U.S. and global society.

This course analyzes family diversity both across and within  these U.S. racial ethnic groups: Black African American, Latino/a American, Asian & Pacific American, Native American as well as White European American and Socio-Religious Ethnic Groups (such as Catholic, Baptist, Mormon, Amish, Jewish, Muslim). To a lesser extent, we explore the nature and basis of racial ethnic diversity, inequality, and relations in families globally in periphery, semi-periphery, and core regions of the world-economy (such as China, Mexico, Nigeria, Japan, Ghana, Russia, Israel, Kenya, Australia, India, Pakistan, S. Africa, Germany, Iraq, Britain, Cuba, France, Haiti, Jamaica, Ireland). We also examine what sociologist Gerhard Lenski termed "the religious factor," which creates diversity in families in the U.S. and around the world.

In learning about, analyzing, and discussing diversity in racial ethnic families, class participants will consider the strengths, resiliency, and contributions of diverse families and their societal, historical, contemporary, and future opportunities and challenges.  We also examine what sociologist Gerhard Lenski termed "the religious factor," which creates diversity in families in the U.S. and around the world.

by bmbarnet@illinois.edu (Professor Bernice Barnett) / Dec 6, 2016, 11:30 AM

Spring 2017 

EPS 420"Sociology of Education" Graduate 4 hrs Section A: crn# 33100 
Undergraduate 3 hrs Section B: crn#64898

SOC 420 "Sociology of Education" Graduate 4 hrs Section A: crn# 33102     
Undergraduate 3 hrs Section B: crn#64900

Course Credit: 3 or 4 Hours Credit

Days, Time, Location: Tue, 10:00-11:50 a.m.; Room 323, Education Building

Maximum Enrollment Spaces: 36 students

Course Description:

This 400-level social foundations course is a combined Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate level (Juniors and Seniors) sociological examination of education and schooling in society. Concentration is on introducing, surveying, synthesizing, and evaluating theories, research, and issues in the sociology of education. Course topics include: sociological theories, research methods, and concepts in education; different eras of change and reforms in U.S. education/schooling within changing social-historical-political contexts; the expansion of education in U.S. and the world (especially to diverse groups, including poor/working classes, girls/women, racial/ethnic minorities, language minorities, disabled/special needs, immigrants); schools as social organizations; education as an institution interconnected to other societal institutions (esp., family, economy, politics, religion, etc); un/equal education opportunity and achievement; family background and school achievement; sexual harassment in schooling; school bullying/cyber bullying; school cheating scandals; college costs and student debt; education and stratification; cultural vs. structural approaches to explaining unequal educational attainment; the impact of race, gender, class (RGC), ethnicity, language, accent, residence, citizenship, immigrant status, disability and other stratifying relations in education and schooling from pre-K, elementary, middle, and high schools to community colleges, public and private 4 year colleges, and research universities, including teaching-learning, schooling experiences, opportunities/barriers, achievement; teacher training, professionalization, and expectations; student tracking, ability grouping; student & teacher activism; school funding; contest vs sponsored mobility; comparisons of U.S. to other countries’ education systems, access by RGC+, T-scores; higher education administration; debates about NCLB, Race to the Top, Common Core, Dream Act, charter schools, at-risk schools, faith based schools, Afrocentric schools, and for profit schools.

Spotlight on The 1960s: We also examine the impact and legacies of diverse social movements on education, especially movements of the 1960s when many students, Hippies, women, disabled, special needs, White European Americans, Black African Americans, Latinos/as, Asian Americans, Native/American Indians, LGBTQ, welfare recipients, language minorities, immigrants/migrants, and others protested in/outside of classrooms, schools, colleges/universities. For questions, contact Prof. Barnett bmbarnet@illinois.edu)

by npobrien@illinois.edu (Nancy O'Brien) / Dec 5, 2016, 5:00 AM

The Library will have significantly reduced hours during winter break. All libraries on campus will be closed December 23-January 2.

The Social Sciences, Health, and Education Library (SSHEL) will be open regular Fall semester hours through the end of finals, closing on Friday December 16 at 6:00pm. We will be closed December 23 through January 2.  On December 19-22, January 3-6, and January 9-12, SSHEL will be open 8:30am-5pm.  On Friday, January 13, the Library opens at 1pm.  The Library is closed on weekends during winter break. Spring semester hours resume on Tuesday, January 17. 

If you need Library materials or services for your research or studies, please plan ahead.

For a complete list of library hours during winter break, see: http://www.library.illinois.edu/#hoursloc

Enjoy the winter break!

by Cameron McCarthy / Nov 29, 2016, 12:45 PM

Spring 2017
Professor Cameron McCarthy

This seminar is intended as an overview of the major currents of thought in this emergent body of scholarly work.  After considering some preliminary issues of the history, definition and terms of reference of postcolonial theory, we will explore the major themes and substantive theoretical and methodological claims and interventions of postcolonial theorists.  This seminar should have broad appeal to students pursuing critical studies in the humanities, social sciences, education, the communications fields and in the emerging field of globalization theory.  Every effort will be made in this seminar to explore interdisciplinary connections between postcolonial theory and other related bodies of thought such a cultural studies, postmodernism, globalization studies, feminist theory, and research in the areas of development and dependency theory and modernization studies.

by Dr. Cameron McCarthy / Nov 29, 2016, 5:00 AM

Within the past decade and a half or so, there has been a steady expansion of scholarship calling attention to the rethinking of center-periphery relations between the third world and the first world. This body of scholarship—most often identified with literature studies, but which has expanded well beyond to other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences—has come to be known as postcolonial theory. Proponents of postcolonial theory have sought to address a wide range of topics related to the historical and contemporary relationship between metropolitan and periphery countries as well as the spatio-temporal impact of colonial and neo-colonial relations on dominant and subordinated groups in the metropolitan countries themselves. These topics include the historical and geographical evolution of colonial relations and post-independence developments in countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean; patterns of identity formation, cultural representation, translation and cross-cultural connection between the metropole and the periphery in disciplinary areas such as literature, popular culture, music and art; and, concerns bearing upon the redefinition of the nation state in the light of globalization or the intensification and rapid movement of cultural and economic capital across national borders. Postcolonial scholars have also foraged into the area of research methods insisting on a critique of methodological nationalism, the foregrounding of interdisciplinarity and the critical integration of scholarly methods across social science and humanities paradigms.

This course is intended as an overview of the major currents of thought in this emergent body of scholarly work.  After considering some preliminary issues of the history, definition and terms of reference of postcolonial theory, we will explore the major themes and substantive theoretical and methodological claims and interventions of postcolonial theorists.  This course should have broad appeal to students pursuing critical studies in the humanities, social sciences, education, the communications fields and in the emerging field of globalization theory.  Every effort will be made in the course to explore interdisciplinary connections between postcolonial theory and other related bodies of thought such as cultural studies, postmodernism, globalization studies, feminist theory, and research in the areas of development and dependency theory and modernization studies.