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William Cope

Biography

Bill Cope's R&D explores the pedagogical affordances of technology mediated learning environments. From 2010-2013 he was Chair of the Journals Publication Committee of the American Educational Research Association.

Key Professional Appointments

  • Professor, Education Policy, Organization and Leadership, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Professor, Information Trust Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Professor, Health Care Engineering Systems Center, Coordinated Science Lab, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Professor, European Union Center, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Research & Service

Bill Cope is a Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Illinois. He is Principal Investigator in a series of major projects funded by the Institute of Educational Sciences in the US Department of Education, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Science Foundation, researching and developing educational technologies. He has co-authored or co-edited: New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education, Cambridge University Press, 2008 (2nd edition, 2012); Ubiquitous Learning, University of Illinois Press, 2009; Towards a Semantic Web: Connecting Knowledge in Academic Research, Elsevier, 2009; Literacies, Cambridge University Press 2012 (2nd edition, 2016); A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies, Palgrave, 2016; e-Learning Ecologies, Routledge, 2017; and a two volume grammar of multimodal meaning: Making Sense: Reference, Agency and Structure in a Grammar of Multimodal Meaning, and Adding Sense: Context and Interest in a Grammar of Multimodal Meaning, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

Publications

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Accepted/In press). The cybernetics of learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory.  link >

Lim, F. V., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2022). A Metalanguage for Learning: Rebalancing the Cognitive with the Socio-Material. Frontiers in Communication, 7, [830613].  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., & Searsmith, D. (2021). Artificial intelligence for education: Knowledge and its assessment in AI-enabled learning ecologies. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 53(12), 1229-1245.  link >

McMichael, M., Ferguson, D. C., Allender, M. C., Cope, W., Kalantzis, M., Haniya, S., Searsmith, D., & Montebello, M. (2021). Use of a multimodal, peer-to-peer learning management system for introduction of critical clinical thinking to first-year veterinary students. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 48(2), 170-180.  link >

Muck, K., & Cope, B. (2021). A proposal of formative assessment in EFL teaching and learning: Online writing and peer-review activities. Ilha do Desterro, 74(3), 323-349.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Accepted/In press). Futures for research in education. Educational Philosophy and Theory.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2020). Making Sense: Reference, Agency, and Structure in a Grammar of Multimodal Meaning. Cambridge University Press.  link >

Haniya, S., Tzirides, A. O., Georgiadou, K., Montebello, M., Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2020). Assessment Innovation in Higher Education by Integrating Learning Analytics. International Journal of Learning and Teaching, 6(1), 53-57.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2020). Adding Sense: Context and Interest in a Grammar of Multimodal Meaning. Cambridge University Press.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2020). Introduction: The Digital Learner – Towards a Reflexive Pedagogy. In M. Montebello (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Digital Learning (pp. xviii-xxxi). IGI Global.

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2020). Multiculturalism and education policy. In Ethnicity, Class and Gender in Australia (pp. 82-97). Taylor and Francis.

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2020). The Problem of Empathy. In S. S. Abrams, M. B. Schaefer, & D. Ness (Eds.), Child-Parent Research Reimagined (pp. ix–xxiii ). Brill.

Peters, M. A., Rizvi, F., Mcculloch, G., Gibbs, P., Gorur, R., Hong, M., Hwang, Y., Zipin, L., Brennan, M., Robertson, S., Quay, J., Malbon, J., Taglietti, D., Barnett, R., Chengbing, W., Mclaren, P., Apple, R., Papastephanou, M., Burbules, N. C., ... Misiaszek, L. (2020). Reimagining the new pedagogical possibilities for universities post-Covid-19: An EPAT Collective Project. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 1-45.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2019). Education 2.0: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Test. Beijing International Review of Education, 1(2-3), 528-543.  link >

Haniya, S., Tzirides, A. O., Montebello, M., Georgiadou, K., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2019). Maximizing Learning Potential with Multimodality: A Case Study. World Journal of Educational Research, 6(2), 260-269.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2019). Foreword. Studies in Computational Intelligence, 840, vii-x.

Kuzi, S., Cope, W., Ferguson, D., Geigle, C., & Zhai, C. X. (2019). Automatic assessment of complex assignments using topic models. In Proceedings of the 6th 2019 ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L@S 2019 (Proceedings of the 6th 2019 ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L@S 2019). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.  link >

Montebello, M., Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Amina, T., Searsmith, D., Tzirides, A., & Haniya, S. (2019). Deepening e-learning through social-collaborative intelligence. In Frontiers in Education: Fostering Innovation Through Diversity, FIE 2018 - Conference Proceedings [8658779] (Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE; Vol. 2018-October). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc..  link >

Montebello, M., Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Haniya, S., Amina, T., Tzirides, A. O., Searsmith, D., Zhao, N., & Chen, M. (2019). Multimodal Mastery Learning. International Journal of Learning and Teaching, 5(1), 19-23.  link >

Pinheiro, P., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2019). Changing forms and uses of citations in the journal article genre: Disruptive change and changing knowledge ecologies in the era of digital text. International Journal of the Book, 17(2), 1-13.  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., & Smith, A. (2018). Pedagogies and Literacies, Disentangling the Historical Threads: An Interview with Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis. Theory Into Practice, 57(1), 5-11.  link >

Karmaker Santu, S. K., Geigle, C., Ferguson, D., Cope, W., Kalantzis, M., Searsmith, D., & Zhai, C. (2018). SOFSAT: Towards a Setlike Operator Based Framework for Semantic Analysis of Text. SIGKDD Explorations Newsletter, 20(2), 21–30.  link >

Montebello, M., Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Tzirides, A. O., Haniya, S., Amina, T., Searsmith, D., Zhao, N., & Chen, M. (2018). Critical thinking through a reflexive platform. In 2018 17th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, ITHET 2018 [8424778] (2018 17th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, ITHET 2018). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc..  link >

Montebello, M., Pinheiro, P., Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Haniya, S., Tzirides, A. O., Amina, T., & Searsmith, D. (2018). Enriching Online Education through Differentiated Learning. Paper presented at Fourth International Conference on Higher Education Advances.  link >

Montebello, M., Pinheiro, P., Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Amina, T., Searsmith, D., & Cao, D. (2018). The impact of the peer review process evolution on learner performance in e-learning environments. In Proceedings of the 5th Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L at S 2018 [35] (Proceedings of the 5th Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L at S 2018). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2017). Conceptualizing e-Learning. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), e-Learning Ecologies: Principles for New Learning and Assessment (pp. 1-45). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Eds.) (2017). e-Learning Ecologies: Principles for New Learning and Assessment. Routledge.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2017). New Media and Productive Diversity in Learning. In S. Barsch, N. Glutsch, & M. Massumi (Eds.), Diversity in der LehrerInnenbildung: Internationale Dimensionen der Vielfalt in Forschung und Praxis (pp. 308-323). (LehrerInnenbildung gestalten; Vol. 9). Waxmann Verlag GMBH.

Smith, A., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2017). The Quantified Writer: Data Traces in Education. In K. A. Mills, A. Stornaiuolo, A. Smith, & J. Z. Pandya (Eds.), Handbook of Writing, Literacies, and Education in Digital Cultures (pp. 235-247). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Eds.) (2016). A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Learning by Design. Palgrave Macmillan.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2016). Big Data Comes to School: Implications for Learning, Assessment, and Research. AERA Open, 2(2).  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2016). Big Data Comes to School: Implications for Learning, Assessment, and Research. AERA Open, 2(2).  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2016). The Things You Do to Know: An Introduction to the Pedagogy of Multiliteracies. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Learning by Design (pp. 1-36). Palgrave Macmillan.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2016). Learner differences in theory and practice. Open Review of Educational Research, 3(1), 85-132.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2016). Learning by Design. (2 ed.) Common Ground.

Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., Chan, E., & Dalley-Trim, L. (2016). Literacies. (2 ed.) Cambridge University Press.  link >

Olmanson, J., Kennett, K., Magnifico, A., McCarthey, S., Searsmith, D., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2016). Visualizing Revision: Leveraging Student-Generated Between-Draft Diagramming Data in Support of Academic Writing Development. Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 21(1), 99-123.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2015). ExtraUrbia, or, the Reconfiguration of Spaces and Flows in a Time of Spatial-Financial Crisis. In D. Araya (Ed.), Smart Cities as Democratic Ecologies (pp. 219-246). Palgrave Macmillan.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2015). Interpreting Evidence-of-Learning: Educational research in the era of big data. Open Review of Educational Research, 2(1), 218-239.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2015). Sources of Evidence-of-Learning: Learning and assessment in the era of big data. Open Review of Educational Research, 2(1), 194-217.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2015). Regimes of Literacy. In R. Heydon, K. Hibbert, & R. Stooke (Eds.), Negotiating Spaces for Literacy Learning : Multimodality and Governmentality (pp. 15–24). Bloomsbury Academic.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2014). Afterword: Literacies of Life Meet Literacies of School. In S. S. Abrams (Ed.), Integrating Virtual and Traditional Learning in 6–12 Classrooms: A Layered Literacies Approach to Multimodal Meaning Making (pp. 115-121). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2014). Changing knowledge ecologies and the transformation of the scholarly journal. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Academic Journal (2 ed., pp. 9-83). Chandos Publishing.  link >

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (2014). Introduction. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Academic Journal (2 ed., pp. 1-8). Elsevier Inc..  link >

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (Eds.) (2014). The Future of the Academic Journal. (2 ed.) Chandos Publishing.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2014). ‘Education Is the New Philosophy’, to Make a Metadisciplinary Claim for the Learning Sciences. In A. D. Reid, E. P. Hart, & M. A. Peters (Eds.), A Companion to Research in Education (pp. 101-115). Springer.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2013). “Multiliteracies”: New Literacies, New Learning. In M. R. Hawkins (Ed.), Framing Languages and Literacies: Socially Situated Views and Perspectives (pp. 105-135). Taylor and Francis.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2013). New media, new learning and new assessments. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(4), 328-331.  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Abd-El-Khalick, F., & Bagley, E. (2013). Science in writing: Learning scientific argument in principle and practice. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(4), 420-441.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2013). Towards a new learning: The Scholar social knowledge workspace, in theory and practice. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(4), 332-356.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2013). On transformation: Reflections on the work of, and working with, Gunther Kress. In M. Böck, & N. Pachler (Eds.), Multimodality and Social Semiosis: Communication, Meaning-Making, and Learning in the Work of Gunther Kress (pp. 16-30). Taylor and Francis.  link >

Magnifico, A. M., Olmanson, J., & Cope, B. (2013). New pedagogies of motivation: Reconstructing and repositioning motivational constructs in the design of learning technologies. E-Learning and Digital Media, 10(4), 483-511.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2012). Literacies. (1 ed.) Cambridge University Press.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2012). Multiliteracies in Education. In C. A. Chapelle (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics Blackwell Publishing Ltd..  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2012). New learning: A charter for change in education. Critical Studies in Education, 53(1), 83-94.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2012). New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education. (2 ed.) Cambridge University Press.  link >

Wilson, D., Cope, B., & Peters, M. A. (2012). The parable of the physicist and the postmodernists. Policy Futures in Education, 10(2), 229-233.  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., Kress, G., & Martin, J. (2011). Bibliographical Essay: Developing the Theory and Practice of Genre-based Literacy. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), The Powers of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing Routledge.

Cope, W., & Kalantzis, M. (2011). ‘Design’ in Principle and Practice: A Reconsideration of the Terms of Design Engagement. Design Journal, 14(1), 45-63.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2011). Introduction: How a Genre Approach to Literacy Can Transform the Way Writing Is Taught. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), The Powers of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., McCarthey, S., Vojak, C., & Kline, S. (2011). Technology-Mediated Writing Assessments: Principles and Processes. Computers and Composition, 28(2), 79-96.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2011). The Power of Literacy and the Literacy of Power. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), The Powers of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing Routledge.

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Eds.) (2011). The Powers of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing. (Routledge Library Editions: Education). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., Kalantzis, M., & Magee, L. (2011). Towards a Semantic Web: Connecting Knowledge in Academic Research. Chandos Publishing.  link >

Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., Noble, G., & Poynting, S. (2011). Cultures of Schooling: Pedagogies for Cultural Difference and Social Access. (Routledge Library Editions: Education). Routledge.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2011). Histories of Pedagogy, Cultures of Schooling. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), The Powers of Literacy: A Genre Approach to Teaching Writing Routledge.  link >

Vojak, C., Kline, S., Cope, B., McCarthey, S., & Kalantzis, M. (2011). New Spaces and Old Places: An Analysis of Writing Assessment Software. Computers and Composition, 28(2), 97-111.  link >

Cloonan, A., Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2010). Schemas for Meaning-Making and Multimodal Texts. In T. Locke (Ed.), Beyond the Grammar Wars: A Resource for Teachers and Students on Developing Language Knowledge in the English/Literacy Classroom (pp. 254-275). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2010). Evaluating Webs of Knowledge: A Critical Examination of the 'Impact Factor'. Logos (Netherlands), 21(3-4), 58-73.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2010). From Gutenberg to the Internet: How Digitisation Transforms Culture and Knowledge. Logos (Netherlands), 21(1-2), 12-39.  link >

Cope, W., & Kalantzis, M. (2010). Ubiquitous learning: An agenda for educational transformation. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), Ubiquitous Learning (pp. 1-14). University of Illinois Press.

Cope, W., & Kalantzis, M. (Eds.) (2010). Ubiquitous Learning. University of Illinois Press.

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2010). Introduction: The beginnings of an idea. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), Ubiquitous Learning (pp. ix-xiv). University of Illinois Press.

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, W. (2010). Learning by design. E-Learning, 7(3), 198-199.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2010). The teacher as designer: Pedagogy in the new media age. E-Learning, 7(3), 200-222.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). A grammar of multimodality. International Journal of Learning, 16(2), 361-426.  link >

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (2009). Introduction. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Academic Journal (1 ed., pp. 1-9). Chandos Publishing.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). “Multiliteracies”: New Literacies, New Learning. Pedagogies, 4(3), 164-195.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). New Media, New Learning. In D. R. Cole, & D. L. Pullen (Eds.), Multiliteracies in Motion: Current Theory and Practice (pp. 87-104). Routledge.  link >

Cope, W., & Phillips, A. (2009). Preface. The Future of the Academic Journal.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Signs of epistemic disruption: Transformations in the knowledge system of the academic journal. First Monday, 14(4).  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Signs of epistemic disruption: Transformations in the knowledge system of the academic journal. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Academic Journal (1 ed., pp. 13-61). Chandos Publishing.  link >

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (Eds.) (2009). The Future of the Academic Journal. (1 ed.) Chandos Publishing.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). The role of the internet in changing knowledge ecologies. Arbor, 185(737), 521-530.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2009). Foreword. In D. L. Pullen, & D. R. Cole (Eds.), Multiliteracies and Technology Enhanced Education: Social Practice and the Global Classroom (pp. xiii-xv). IGI Global.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2008). Language Education and Multiliteracies. In N. H. Hornberger (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Education (pp. 195-211). Springer.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2008). New Learning: Elements of a Science of Education. (1 ed.) Cambridge University Press.  link >

Yelland, N., Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2008). Learning by Design: Creating pedagogical frameworks for knowledge building in the twenty-first century. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 36(3), 197-213.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2007). The social web: changing knowledge systems in higher education. In D. Epstein, R. Boden, R. Deem, F. Rizvi, & S. Wright (Eds.), Geographies of Knowledge, Geometries of Power: Framing the Future of Higher Education (World Yearbook of Education; Vol. 2008). Routledge.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2006). From literacy to 'multiliteracies': Learning to mean in the new communications environment. English Studies in Africa, 49(1), 23-45.  link >

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (2006). Introduction. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Book in the Digital Age (pp. 1-18). Chandos Publishing.

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2006). New Text Technologies, Globalization and the Future of the Book. In B. Cope, & A. Phillips (Eds.), The Future of the Book in the Digital Age (pp. 191-210). Chandos Publishing.

Cope, B., & Phillips, A. (Eds.) (2006). The Future of the Book in the Digital Age. Chandos Publishing.

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2006). Big change question - Taking into account mainstream economic and political trends, can/should school have a role in developing authentic critical thinking? Journal of Educational Change, 7(3), 209-214.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, W. (2006). Foreword. Shift to the Future: Rethinking Learning with New Technologies in Education, ix-x.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2006). On globalisation and diversity. Computers and Composition, 23(4), 402-411.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2004). Text-Made Text. E-Learning and Digital Media, 1(2), 198-282.  link >

Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2004). Designs for Learning. E-Learning and Digital Media, 1(1), 38-93.  link >

Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., & Harvey, A. (2003). Assessing multiliteracies and the new basics. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice, 21(1), 15-26.  link >

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (Eds.) (2001). Reconciliation, Multiculturalism, Identities: Difficult Dialogues, Sensible Solutions. Common Ground.

Teaching

Bill Cope is lead in the Learning Design and Leadership concentration in the Department of Educational Policy, Organization and Leadership, offering certificate, masters and doctoral degrees.

Courses

Assessment for Learning (EPOL 534) For several decades now, assessment has become an increasingly pressing education priority. Teacher and school accountability systems have come to be based on analysis of large-scale, standardized summative assessments. As a consequence, assessment now dominates most conversations about reform, particularly as a measure of teacher and school accountability for learner performance. Behind the often heated and at times ideologically gridlocked debates is a genuine challenge to address gaps in achievement between different demographically identifiable groups of students. There is an urgent need to lift whole communities and cohorts of students out of cycles of underachievement. For better or for worse, testing and public reporting of achievement is seen to be one of the few tools capable of clearly informing public policy makers and communities alike about how their resources are being used to expand the life opportunities for their children. This course is an overview of current debates about testing, and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of approaches to assessment. The course also focuses on the use of assessment technologies in learning. It will explore recent advances in computer adaptive and diagnostic testing, the use of natural language processing technologies in assessments, and embedded formative assessments in digital and online curricula. Same as EPS 535. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Assessment for Learning (EPOL 534) For several decades now, assessment has become an increasingly pressing education priority. Teacher and school accountability systems have come to be based on analysis of large-scale, standardized summative assessments. As a consequence, assessment now dominates most conversations about reform, particularly as a measure of teacher and school accountability for learner performance. Behind the often heated and at times ideologically gridlocked debates is a genuine challenge to address gaps in achievement between different demographically identifiable groups of students. There is an urgent need to lift whole communities and cohorts of students out of cycles of underachievement. For better or for worse, testing and public reporting of achievement is seen to be one of the few tools capable of clearly informing public policy makers and communities alike about how their resources are being used to expand the life opportunities for their children. This course is an overview of current debates about testing, and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of approaches to assessment. The course also focuses on the use of assessment technologies in learning. It will explore recent advances in computer adaptive and diagnostic testing, the use of natural language processing technologies in assessments, and embedded formative assessments in digital and online curricula. Same as EPS 535. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

Ubiquitous Learning (EPOL 580) Explores the dynamics of learning using mobile computing devices, broadly defined to range from mobile phones, tablets and laptops to interesting new possibilities raised by emerging technologies such as wearable devices and a potentially pervasive "internet of things". Our journey will take us through museums, galleries and parks - real and virtual. We will visit new media and gaming spaces in which either incidental or explicit learning is taking place. We will look at sites of informal as well as formal learning - extraordinary classrooms offering blended learning opportunities, as well as new forms and modes of out-of-school and self-directed learning. EdM and EdD students will meet online from 5:30-6:30 PM.

Ubiquitous Learning (EPOL 580) Explores the dynamics of learning using mobile computing devices, broadly defined to range from mobile phones, tablets and laptops to interesting new possibilities raised by emerging technologies such as wearable devices and a potentially pervasive "internet of things". Our journey will take us through museums, galleries and parks - real and virtual. We will visit new media and gaming spaces in which either incidental or explicit learning is taking place. We will look at sites of informal as well as formal learning - extraordinary classrooms offering blended learning opportunities, as well as new forms and modes of out-of-school and self-directed learning. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

eLearning Ecologies (EPOL 583) An examination of emerging environments of eLearning, some setting out to emulate the heritage social relationships and discourses of the classroom, others attempting to create new forms of learning. Aims to push the imaginative boundaries of what might be possible in eLearning environments. Explores the ways in which assessments can be constructed and implemented which are integral to the learning process, with the assistance of today's new media, 'big data' and other information technologies.

eLearning Ecologies (EPOL 583) An examination of emerging environments of eLearning, some setting out to emulate the heritage social relationships and discourses of the classroom, others attempting to create new forms of learning. Aims to push the imaginative boundaries of what might be possible in eLearning environments. Explores the ways in which assessments can be constructed and implemented which are integral to the learning process, with the assistance of today's new media, 'big data' and other information technologies. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

General Field Research Seminar (EPOL 586) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their general field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the general field literature, which will become part of their dissertation. This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the General Field Qualifying Examination. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at this time is not required.

General Field Research Seminar (EPOL 586) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their general field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the general field literature, which will become part of their dissertation. This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the General Field Qualifying Examination.

General Field Research Seminar (EPOL 586) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their general field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the general field literature, which will become part of their dissertation. This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the General Field Qualifying Examination. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Special Field Research Seminar (EPOL 587) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their special field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the special field literature, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Special Field Qualifying Examination.

Special Field Research Seminar (EPOL 587) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their special field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the special field literature, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Special Field Qualifying Examination. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Special Field Research Seminar (EPOL 587) This course will guide doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of their special field of doctoral study. Students will conduct a synthesized and critical review of the special field literature, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Special Field Qualifying Examination. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at this time is not required.

Methodology Research Seminar (EPOL 588) This course will guide EDD doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of the methodological approaches in their doctoral field. Students will critique methodologies used in educational research and develop a thorough methodological proposal for their research, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Research Methodology Qualifying Examination.

Methodology Research Seminar (EPOL 588) This course will guide EDD doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of the methodological approaches in their doctoral field. Students will critique methodologies used in educational research and develop a thorough methodological proposal for their research, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Research Methodology Qualifying Examination. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at this time is not required.

Methodology Research Seminar (EPOL 588) This course will guide EDD doctoral students as they develop a broad and critical understanding of the methodological approaches in their doctoral field. Students will critique methodologies used in educational research and develop a thorough methodological proposal for their research, which will become part of their dissertation.This course may meet the doctoral requirement of the Research Methodology Qualifying Examination. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Meaning Patterns (EPOL 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education. ONLINE STUDENT SECTION. Synchronous attendance recommended. Scholar LMS. This course addresses the ways in which knowledge is represented, with special reference to the knowledge representations of teachers and learners. Its interdisciplinary bases are functional linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, history of ideas, media/communication studies, and ontology in computer science. The focal point of the course is the five questions about meaning posed by Cope and Kalantzis in their transpositional grammar: “what is this about?” (reference); “who or what is doing this?” (agency); “what holds this together?” (structure); “how does this fit with its surroundings?” (context); and “what is this for?” (interest). Along these lines of inquiry, a transpositional grammar addresses language, image, embodied action, object and space. “Transposition” refers to the movement across these various forms of meaning, intensified in the era of pervasively multimodal, digitally-mediat

Meaning Patterns (EPOL 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education. Synchronous attendance recommended. Scholar LMS. This course addresses the ways in which knowledge is represented, with special reference to the knowledge representations of teachers and learners. Its interdisciplinary bases are functional linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, history of ideas, media/communication studies, and ontology in computer science. The focal point of the course is the five questions about meaning posed by Cope and Kalantzis in their transpositional grammar: “what is this about?” (reference); “who or what is doing this?” (agency); “what holds this together?” (structure); “how does this fit with its surroundings?” (context); and “what is this for?” (interest). Along these lines of inquiry, a transpositional grammar addresses language, image, embodied action, object and space. “Transposition” refers to the movement across these various forms of meaning, intensified in the era of pervasively multimodal, digitally-mediated communications. Appli

Thesis Seminar (EPOL 591) Designed to take students through the entire process of proposal development, this course is intended for masters or doctoral students who are ready to prepare a thesis or dissertation proposal. Students will learn to use a systematic and comprehensive approach to develop the research proposal and how each step in the research process is related. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at this time is not required.

Thesis Seminar (EPOL 591) Designed to take students through the entire process of proposal development, this course is intended for masters or doctoral students who are ready to prepare a thesis or dissertation proposal. Students will learn to use a systematic and comprehensive approach to develop the research proposal and how each step in the research process is related.

Thesis Seminar (EPOL 591) Designed to take students through the entire process of proposal development, this course is intended for masters or doctoral students who are ready to prepare a thesis or dissertation proposal. Students will learn to use a systematic and comprehensive approach to develop the research proposal and how each step in the research process is related. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Independent Study (EPOL 595) Offers opportunity and challenge of self-directive, independent study; develops the individual's ability as an independent student and enables the student to pursue needed study in a field in which appropriate courses are not being offered during a given term.

Thesis Research (EPOL 599) Individual direction of research and thesis writing.

New Learning (EPS 431)

Ubiquitous Learning (EPS 506) EdM and EdD students will meet online from 5:30-6:30 PM.

Ubiquitous Learning (EPS 506) Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Assessment for Learning (EPS 535) Master's students meet from 5:30-6:30 PM and doctoral students meet from 6:30-7:30 PM.

Assessment for Learning (EPS 535)

Meaning Patterns (EPS 590) Seminar in educational policy studies; sections offered in the following fields: (a) history of education; (b) philosophy of education; (c) comparative education; (d) social foundations of education; (e) philosophy of educational research; and (f) historical methods in education. EdM students will meet from 5:30-6:30pm and EdD students will meet from 6:30-7:30pm. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at these times is not required. This course addresses the ways in which knowledge is represented, with special reference to the knowledge representations of teachers and learners. Its interdisciplinary bases are functional linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, history of ideas, media/communication studies, and ontology in computer science. The focal point of the course is the five questions about meaning posed by Cope and Kalantzis in their transpositional grammar: “what is this about?” (reference); “who or what is doing this?” (agency); “what holds this together?” (structure); “how does this fit with its surroundings?” (context); and “what is this for?” (interest). Along these lines of inquiry, a transpositional grammar addresses language, image, embodied action, object and space. “Transposition” refers to the movement across these various

Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech (EPSY 408) Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions. Master's students meet from 5:30-6:30 PM and doctoral students meet from 6:30-7:30 PM.

Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech (EPSY 408) Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions.

Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech (EPSY 408) Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions. Synchronous attendance not required. Scholar LMS.

Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech (EPSY 408) Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions. EdM students will meet from 5:30-6:30pm and EdD students will meet from 6:30-7:30pm. Sessions will be recorded, so attendance at these times is not required.

Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech (EPSY 408) Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions. Synchronous attendance recommended. Scholar LMS.

Tech & Educational Change (EPSY 560) Today's wave of educational technologies foreshadow what may be a second great education revolution, after the rise of mass-institutional education in the nineteenth century. This has the potential to transform the characteristic communication artifacts of classrooms, teacher lecture, classroom discourse and textbooks. This course explores the possibilities for educational technologies to influence educational change. However, with a critical eye, we also raise the concerns - we can use digital media to prolong the life of old ways of learning, for instance, where the video-lecturing teacher, the monovocal e-textbook or the bullet-pointed PowerPoint presentation transmit facts and concepts. How can we use the affordances of networked digital media to do something different? Can we imagine learning where the knowledge that learners bring to the table is valued, where learners' knowledge repertoires are extended as they actively make new knowledge, and which build collaborative knowledge cultures? 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

Meaning Patterns (ERAM 557) Addresses the ways in which knowledge is represented, with special reference to the knowledge representations of teachers and learners. Its interdisciplinary bases are functional linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, history of ideas, media/communication studies, and ontology in computer science. The focal point of the course is the five questions about meaning posed by Cope and Kalantzis in their transpositional grammar: "what is this about?" (reference); "who or what is doing this?" (agency); "what holds this together?" (structure); "how does this fit with its surroundings?" (context); and "what is this for?" (interest). Along these lines of inquiry, a transpositional grammar addresses language, image, embodied action, object and space. "Transposition" refers to the movement across these various forms of meaning, intensified in the era of pervasively multimodal, digitally-mediated communications. Applied to education, not only does this provide a valuable heuristic to reframe literacy teaching and learning (the original impulse for the development of this grammar). It also offers an integrated account of meaning-to-learn across all subject areas, including pedagogical content knowledge and learner knowledge representations. Conceived in the broader terms of social-scientific research methods, transpositional grammar is an attempt to overcome the narrowness and logocentrism of "the language turn" which dominated social sciences in the twentieth century. In a practical sense, semiotics of the kind explored in this course also provides tools for reading and interpreting multimodal texts and research data. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

e-Learning Ecologies (HRD 572) EdM students will meet from 5:30-6:30. EdD students will meet from 6:30-7:30.

eLearning Ecologies (HRD 572)

e-Learning Ecologies (HRD 572) EdM students will meet online from 5:30-6:30 PM. EdD students will meet online from 6:30-7:30 PM.

eLearning Ecologies (HRD 572) EdM students will meet from 5:30-6:30. EdD students will meet from 6:30-7:30.