Biography

Dr. Lindgren’s research examines theories and designs for learning within emerging media platforms (e.g., simulations, virtual environments, mobile devices, video games, augmented and mixed reality, etc.). He seeks to understand how digital technologies can be used to construct new identities and generate new perspectives that lead to stronger comprehension of complex ideas, particularly in STEM content areas. His work investigates how physical, body-based interactions with learning content can facilitate new understandings, and how games and simulations can be effectively designed to take these types of interactions as input. He is also interested in how digital technologies can provide new approaches to assessing learning, such as examining where learners focus their attention, what choices they make, and how well they adapt to new situations. Dr. Lindgren is currently PI of three NSF-funded projects examining how people learn in technology-enhanced environments. He and his lab have created prototypes for several STEM learning games and simulations, and they are currently working with local schools and museums to co-design and iterate on several new technology platforms.

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Key Professional Appointments

Assistant Professor Curriculum & Instruction, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2013 - present

Secondary Appointment Educational Psychology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2013 - present

Affiliate Appointment Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology - Human Perception and Performance Group, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2013 - present

Affiliate Appointment Illinois Informatics Institute, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2013 - present

Assistant Professor Digital Media, University of Central Florida, 2009 - 2013

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Education

Ph.D., Learning Sciences and Technology Design, Stanford University, 2009

M.A., Psychology, Stanford University, 2008

B.S., Computer Science (hons), Northwestern University, 2000

Research & Service

Dr. Lindgren’s research examines theories and designs for learning within emerging media platforms (e.g., simulations, virtual environments, mobile devices, video games, augmented and mixed reality, etc.). He seeks to understand how digital technologies can be used to construct new identities and generate new perspectives that lead to stronger comprehension of complex ideas, particularly in STEM content areas. His work investigates how physical, body-based interactions with learning content can facilitate new understandings, and how games and simulations can be effectively designed to take these types of interactions as input. He is also interested in how digital technologies can provide new approaches to assessing learning, such as examining where learners focus their attention, what choices they make, and how well they adapt to new situations. Dr. Lindgren is currently PI of three NSF-funded projects examining how people learn in technology-enhanced environments. He and his lab have created prototypes for several STEM learning games and simulations, and they are currently working with local schools and museums to co-design and iterate on several new technology platforms.

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Publications

Lindgren, R., Tscholl, M., Wang, S., & Johnson, E. (2016) Enhancing learning and engagement through embodied interaction within a mixed reality simulation Computers & Education 95, 174–187  link >

Tscholl, M., & Lindgren, R. (2016) Designing for learning conversations: How parents support children’s science learning within an immersive simulation Science Education 100  link >

Gallagher, S., & Lindgren, R. (2015) Enactive metaphors: Learning through full-body engagement. Educational Psychology Review 27 (3), 391-404  link >

Lindgren, R. (2015) Getting into the cue: Embracing technology-facilitated body movements as a starting point for learning. Learning technologies and the body: Integration and implementation Routledge: New York  link >

Abrahamson, D., & Lindgren, R. (2014) Embodiment and embodied design. Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK  link >

Lindgren, R., & Tscholl, M. (2014) Enacted misconceptions: Using embodied interactive simulations to examine emerging understandings of science concepts.. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Boulder, CO  link >

Tscholl, M., & Lindgren, R. (2014) Empowering digital interactions with real world conversation TechTrends 58 (1), 56-63  link >

Lindgren, R., Moshell, J., & Hughes, C. (2014) Virtual environments as a tool for conceptual learning. Handbook of virtual environments: Design, implementation, and applications Taylor & Francis  link >

Hughes, D., Sabbagh, S., Lindgren, R., Moshell, J., & Hughes, C. (2013) Mixed reality space travel for physics learning Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science 8022, 162-169  link >

Lindgren, R., & Johnson-Glenberg, M. (2013) Emboldened by embodiment: Six precepts for research on embodied learning and mixed reality Educational Researcher 42 (8), 445-452  link >

Lindgren, R., Tscholl, M., & Moshell, J. (2013) MEteor: Developing physics concepts through body-based interaction with a mixed reality simulation. Proceedings of the Physics Education Research Conference: Portland, OR  link >

Tscholl, M., Lindgren, R., & Johnson, E. (2013) Enacting orbits: Refining the design of a full-body learning simulation. Proceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference Proceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference: New York, NY  link >

Lindgren, R. (2012) Generating a learning stance through perspective-taking in a virtual environment Computers in Human Behavior 28 (4), 1130-1139  link >

Lindgren, R., & McDaniel, R. (2012) Transforming online learning through narrative and student agency Journal of Educational Technology & Society 15 (4), 344-355  link >

Lindgren, R., & Pea, R. (2012) Inter-identity technologies for learning Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Sydney, NSW, Australia  link >

Peters, P., Katsaros, A., Howard, R., & Lindgren, R. (2012) An interactive cultural transect: Designing, deploying, and evaluating an online virtual-abroad learning experience Gifted Education International 28 (1), 84-95  link >

Lindgren, R., & Moshell, J. (2011) Supporting children’s learning with body-based metaphors in a mixed reality environment Proceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference  link >

Lindgren, R., & Schwartz, D. (2009) Spatial learning and computer simulations in science International Journal of Science Education 31 (3), 419-438  link >

Schwartz, D., Lindgren, R., & Lewis, S. (2009) Constructivism in an age of non-constructivist assessments. Constructivist Theory Applied to Instruction: Success or Failure? Taylor & Francis: New York, NY  link >

Schwartz, D., Lindgren, R., & Lewis, S. (2009) Constructivism in an age of non-constructivist assessments.. Constructivist Theory Applied to Instruction: Success or Failure? Taylor & Francis: New York  link >

Pea, R., & Lindgren, R. (2008) Video collaboratories for research and education: An analysis of collaboration design patterns IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies 1 (4), 235-247  link >

Pea, R., Lindgren, R., & Rosen, J. (2008) Cognitive technologies for establishing, sharing and comparing perspectives on video over computer network Social Science Information 47 (3), 353-370  link >

Pea, R., Lindgren, R., & Rosen, J. (2006) Computer-supported collaborative video analysis Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Bloomington, IN  link >

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Grants

Principal Investigator DIP: Developing Crosscutting Concepts in STEM with Simulation Theaters for Embodied Leanring, National Science Foundation, 2014 - 2018

Principal Investigator Embodied Explanatory Expressions for Facilitating Science Reasoning and Enhancing Interactive Simulations, National Science Foundation, 2014 - 2018

Principal Investigator Metaphor-Based Learning of Physics Concepts Through Whole-Body Interaction in a Mixed Reality Science Center Exhibit, National Science Foundation, 2013 - 2016

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Courses

Intro to Digital Learning Env Surveys the field of digital environments and their capacity to support teaching and learning. Examines theories of interactivity, immersion, learning with multi-media, and digital literacies to discuss and evaluate various digital environments. Students learn to critically assess digital environments and to create original prototypes that target a specific and important learning or teaching goal. Environments that will be discussed and experimented with in class include virtual worlds, social networks, digital classrooms, interactive exhibits, video games, and tangible technologies.

Educational Game Design Examines the role that physical and digital games play in learning. Focuses on how people learn through play and how game structures support educational outcomes. Principles of game design are described and students apply them to the design of original games with a specified educational objective. Students learn to prototype, playtest, and evaluate the educational content of games. Surveys and samples games in the areas of serious games, persuasive games, games for impact, etc. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Learning and the Body Intensive examination of problems and trends in the subject fields. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

Methods of Educational Inquiry Offers a graduate-level introduction to research in education, including quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods designs and approaches. Key concepts include: identifying a research problem, reviewing the literature, design and analysis, communicating evidence, and the ethics of research. Students should gain the ability to effectively evaluate and critique design/methods sections of research publications; plan and design research studies; and organize a presentation of research to an audience of peers. Course Information: Same as EPOL 550, EPSY 573, and SPED 550. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.: identifying a research problem, reviewing the literature, design and analysis, communicating evidence, and the ethics of research. Students should gain the ability to effectively evaluate and critique design/methods sections of research publications; plan and design research studies; and organize a presentation of research to an audience of peers.

DELTA Grad Seminar Course Information: Approved for both letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral study.

Robb Lindgren

Assistant Professor, Curriculum & Instruction

Contact

Office

394 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth St.
Champaign, IL 61820

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