Biography
Learning occurs when new information is connected to prior knowledge, personal experiences, and interests.
Cheryl Light Shriner

Dr. Light Shriner has had a cross disciplinary training and she approaches the preparation of teachers and other future professionals in a similar manner across all age ranges and settings. She has a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with an Emphasis in Special Education and Severe Disabilities and is a BCBA-D (Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the Doctoral Level). She has been trained in applied behavior analysis, augmentative and alternative communication, special education, educational psychology, and therapeutic recreation. She has expertise working with individuals with autism, moderate to severe intellectual and physical disabilities, individuals with challenging behaviors. She values inclusive collaborations, family involvement, respectful language, and curricular adjustments or accommodations to support people with disabilities and their families.

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Education

BCBA-D (Board Certification in Behavior Analysis as the Doctoral Level), Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Analysis Certification Board, 2014

Research & Service

Within her position as an Assistant Clinical Professor, Dr. Light Shriner supports the Department of Special Education by teaching core courses and supervising future educators in practicum settings. Dr. Light Shriner's specific research interests include identifying and implementing appropriate interventions to teach functional communication alternatives to challenging behavior and the use of visual supports to increase understanding of language and expectations of children, youth, and adults with challenging behavior and/or autism. She is also interested in investigating ways of teaching appropriate adult social skills to individuals with high functioning autism by teaching college students to be effective peer mentors and coaches.

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Grants

Co-Principal Investigator Assistive Technology, Office of Educational Technology,

Teaching

Dr. Light Shriner believes that teaching is more than disseminating information. Teaching is an interactive process with students that involves telling a story, connecting known knowledge with unknown or unfamiliar information, and providing opportunities to investigate areas of interest. Teaching is a process that involves experiences and reflection to find the meaning for each individual. Dr. Light Shriner strives to share the story of people with disabilities and help students make meaning from the story. She strives to help students expand the way they think about and approach problems and circumstances. An important part of teaching is listening. Dr. Light Shriner embeds opportunities for students to reflect and make connections between their own lives and the information they are learning. It is the exchange of experiences and perspectives that facilitates a receptive learning environment. Listening to students' ideas and feedback allows Dr. Light Shriner to adjust teaching techniques and opportunities to allow students to be fully engaged and invested in their education.

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Courses

The Culture of Disability The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the culture of disability across the lifespan. The impact of disabilities on an individual across the lifespan will be explored, and the unique culture that is created by having a disability will be addressed. The historical basis for the disability movement and special education will be addressed, including legislation and litigation that has had a significant impact on the field. Students also will learn about the characteristics of individuals with diverse abilities as well as current trends in educational services.

Intro Intellectual Disability Study of the history and current status of the social, emotional, physical, and learning characteristics and problems of persons with an intellectual disability; identification and diagnosis; available services and provisions; and educational programs and lifelong processes of adaptation for these individuals and their families. Course Information: Same as PSYC 322 and REHB 322. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or SPED 117; or equivalent.

Gen Educator's Role in SPED Examination of issues in educating students with special needs: service delivery models, roles of teachers and related service providers, student assessment, curriculum individualization, instructional strategies, management of problem behaviors, and program evaluation. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Must be registered in teacher licensure program.: service delivery models, roles of teachers and related service providers, student assessment, curriculum individualization, instructional strategies, management of problem behaviors, and program evaluation.

Communication and Phys Disab Focuses upon issues and intervention strategies that can impact the communication skills of persons with moderate or severe intellectual and/or physical disabilities. Specific assessment and intervention strategies are discussed as they relate to both verbal and augmentative communication. Course Information: 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

Augmentative Communication Course focuses on issues and strategies for teaching communication and literacy to individuals with significant intellectual or physical disabilities. Specific assessment and intervention strategies are discussed as they relate to alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) and the development of beginning literacy skills. Course Information: 2 or 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or prior completion of SPED 440, and admission to the Department of Special Education, or consent of instructor.

Learning Environments II Course is designed to provide participants with specific information on intervention and evaluation strategies related to designing and managing effective learning environments and to becoming a discriminating consumer of the professional literature related to behavior interventions. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SPED 470, and admission to the Department of Special Education, or consent of instructor.

Disability Issues in SPED Overview of special education at the graduate level. Focus is placed on issues related to: assessment, identification, and characteristics across all disability areas. The greatest emphasis is placed on strategies for including students with disabilities in the general curriculum. Historical and legal perspectives that provide the foundation for special education are discussed.: assessment, identification, and characteristics across all disability areas. The greatest emphasis is placed on strategies for including students with disabilities in the general curriculum. Historical and legal perspectives that provide the foundation for special education are discussed.

Cheryl Light Shriner

Teaching Assistant Professor, Special Education

Contact

Office

260E Education Building
1310 S. Sixth St.
Champaign, IL 61820

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