Relationship of Project Activities
to NAEYC Accreditation Criteria

Standard B: Curriculum

4. Daily schedule provides a balance of activities in consideration of the child's total daily experience.

B-4a. All age groups play outdoors daily, permitting conditions protect children's health and safety.

B-4b. The schedule provides for alternating periods of quiet and active play.

B-4c. A balance of large-muscle/small-muscle activities is provided in the daily schedule.

B-4d. More than one option for grouping (such as individual, small group, or large group) is available to children most of the day. Infants and toddlers are not expected to function as a large group.

B-4e. A balance of child-initiated and teacher-initiated activity is provided. The amount of time spent in large-group, teacher-initiated activity is limited.

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5. Materials and equipment are appropriate to the age group.

B-5a. Materials and equipment appropriate to the age group (including books, dolls, toys, dress-up props, photos, pictures, music) that project diverse racial, gender, and age attributes are provided.

  • Materials reflect the lives of the children and families served.
  • Materials and equipment reflect the diversity found in society in general.

B-5b. Developmentally appropriate materials and equipment are available for infants.

  • Simple, lightweight, open-ended, easily washable toys such as containers, balls, pop-beads, nesting cups
  • Rattles, squeak toys, action/reaction toys
  • Cuddle toys
  • Toys to mouth such as teethers, rings
  • Pictures of real objects
  • Crawling area with sturdy, stable furniture to pull up self

B-5c. Developmentally appropriate materials and equipment are available for toddlers.

  • Push and pull toys
  • Manipulatives such as stacking toys, large wooden spools/beads/cubes, pounding bench, simple puzzles
  • Sturdy picture books, music
  • Toys for pretending, such as play telephone, dolls
  • Large paper, crayons
  • Sturdy furniture to hold on to while walking
  • Sand and water toys

B-5d. Developmentally appropriate materials and equipment are available for preschoolers.

  • Active play equipment for climbing and balancing
  • Unit blocks and accessories
  • Puzzles, manipulative toys
  • Picture books, audio recordings/tapes, musical instruments
  • Art materials such as finger and tempera paints, crayons, safe scissors, and paste
  • Dramatic play materials such as dolls, dress-up clothes and props, child-sized furniture, puppets
  • Sand and water toys

B-5e. Developmentally appropriate materials and equipment are available for kindergartners.

  • Active play equipment for climbing and balancing
  • Unit blocks and accessories such as figures, signs, cars, trees
  • Construction materials
  • Complex puzzles and manipulative toys for counting, sorting
  • Picture books and early readers
  • Audio recordings/tapes, musical instruments, computers with appropriate software
  • Materials for writing and complex art projects
  • A variety of dramatic play materials and props
  • Board and card games

B-5f. Developmentally appropriate materials and equipment are available for school-agers.

  • Active play equipment and materials such as bats and balls for organized games
  • Construction materials for woodworking, unit blocks, accessories for blocks
  • Materials for hobby and art projects, science projects
  • Materials for dramatics, cooking
  • Books, audio recordings/tapes, musical instruments, computers with appropriate software
  • Board and card games
  • Complex manipulative toys (connecting or interlocking toys), jigsaw puzzles

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6. Active media used in classroom.

B-6a. Active media that children can control, such as videotaping, cameras, audiotaping, and developmentally appropriate computer software may be used in the classroom as active learning materials, along with other materials that children can choose. If such technology is used, the program provides equal access for all children. Teachers help children use these media as independently as possible. (This criterion applies to children 3 years of age and older; it is not applicable to infants and toddlers.)

B-6b. The use of passive media, such as television, films, videotapes, and audiotapes is limited to developmentally appropriate programming.

  • Programs are previewed by adults prior to use.
  • Another option for activity is always available.
  • No child is required to view the program.
  • Teachers discuss what is viewed with the children to develop critical viewing skills.
  • Passive media are used only as infrequent events, rather than as regular, daily routines.

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7. Teachers provide a variety of developmentally appropriate activities and materials that are selected to emphasize concrete experiential learning and to achieve the following goals:

B-7a. Foster positive identity and sense of emotional well-being.

B-7b. Develop social skills.

B-7c. Encourage children to think, reason, question, and experiment.

B-7d. Encourage language and literacy development.

B-7e. Enhance physical development and skills.

B-7f. Encourage and demonstrate sound health, safety, and nutritional practices.

B-7g. Encourage creative expression, representation, and appreciation for the arts.

B-7h. Respect cultural diversity.

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8. Teachers provide materials and time for children to select their own activities during the day.

B-8. Teachers provide materials and time for children to select their own activities during the day.

  • Infants and toddlers have objects and materials for free choice.
  • Several alternative activities are available for children's choice.
  • Teachers respect the child's right not to participiate in some activities.
  • Teachers pick up on activities that children start or interests that children show.
  • Kindergartners and school-agers help prepare materials, plan and choose their own activities at times during the day.

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9. Teachers conduct smooth and unregimented transitions between activities.

B-9. Teachers conduct smooth and unregimented transitions between activities.

  • Children are given advanced notice to prepare them for transitions ahead of time.
  • Children are not always required to move as a group from one activity to another.
  • The new activity is prepared before the transition from the completed activity to avoid prolonged waiting.
  • School-age children help plan and participate in the change of activity, have time to adjust to change from school to program.

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10. Teachers are flexible enough to change planned or routine activities.

B-10. Teachers are flexible enough to change planned or routine activities.

For example,
Staff follow needs or interests of the children.

Staff adjust to changes in weather or other unexpected situations in a relaxed way without upsetting children.

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11. Routine tasks are incorporated into the program as a means of furthering children's learning, self-help, and social skills.

B-11. Routine tasks are incorporated into the program as a means of furthering children's learning, self-help, and social skills.

  • For infants and toddlers, routines are used as a time for pleasant interaction and learning.
  • Routines such as diapering or toileting, eating, dressing, and sleeping or resting are handled in a relaxed, reassuring, and individualized manner based on developmental needs.
  • Teachers plan with families to make toileting, feeding, and the development of other self-regulation skills a positive experience for children.

For example,
Respect infants' individual sleeping schedules; provide alternatives to preschoolers who are early risers; offer kindergartners choices or permit preferences whenever possible; provide school-agers with a place to rest if they choose; respect school-agers' increasing interest in personal grooming.

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University Primary School.
Department of Special Education. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
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