Main Menu Summer 2013

James Hannum

My research interests include the ways in which relationships (marriage, family, and friendships) impact how people cope with significant life stressors and ways that relationships may contribute to pathological conditions such as eating disorders. From a therapeutic standpoint, I am interested in how relationship variables in helping relationships affect the outcome of treatment.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, Stanford University, 1972
  • B.S., Psychology, Iowa State University, 1967

Key Professional Appointments

  • Clinical Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, UIUC, 2005-present
  • Practicum Coordinator, Counseling Psychology Program, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1989-present
  • Associate Chair, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001-2005
  • Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001-2005

Activities & Honors

  • Diplomate in Counseling Psychology, American Board of Professional Psychology, 2004-present
  • Fellow, Illinois Psychological Association, 2004-present
  • Champaign-Urbana Mental Health Public Education Committee, CU Mental Health Public Education Committee, 2003-present
  • Member of the Governor's Task Force on Campus Violence, Governor's Task Force on Campus Violence, Division of Mental Health and Developmental Disability Services, 2007-2008
  • Chair of continuing education legislative committee until 8/07. Since I am no longer a member of the, Illinois Psychological Association, 2006-2008
  • Area representative to the Illinois Psychological Association Executive council, Illinois Psychological Association, 2003-2007
  • Incomplete List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005-2006
  • President, Champaign Area Psychological Society, 1999-2001

Research Statement

My research interests include the ways in which close relationships (marriage, family, and friendships) are helpful or harmful when people cope with significant life stressors. Aspects of close relationships that I have studied include intimacy, friendship, attachment, cohesion, social support, and conflict. Some of the stressful conditions investigated have been illnesses such as cancer and eating disorders, and life challenges such as the transition to college.

Select Publications

  • Meno, C., Hannum, J., Espelage, D., Low, K. (2008). Familial and individual variables as predictors of dieting concerns and binge eating in college females. Eating Behaviors, 9(1), 91-101.
  • Hannum, J. (2007). It's time to establish mandatory continuing education for licensed clinical psychologists. The Illinois Psychologist, XLIV(3) Chicago: Illinois Psychological Association..
  • Hale, C., Hannum, J., Espelage, D. (2005). Social support and physical health: The importance of belonging. Journal of American College Health, 53(6), 276-284.
  • Moyer, C., Rounds, J., Hannum, J. (2004). A meta-analysis of massage therapy research. Psychological Bulletin, 130(1), 3-18.
  • Hannum, J., Dvorak, D. (2004). The effects of family conflict, divorce, and attachment patterns on the psychological distress and social adjustment of college freshmen. Journal of College Student Development, 45, 27-42.