Main Menu Summer 2013

Stafford Hood

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Education, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 1984
  • M.S., Counseling and Guidance, University of Wisconsin, 1975
  • B.A., Political Science, University of Wisconsin, 1974

Key Professional Appointments

  • Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2008-present
  • Professor, Curriculum & Instruction and Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2008-present
  • Head/Professor, Curriculum & Instruction, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2008-2011
  • Associate Dean for Research, College of Education, Arizona State University, 2004-2008
  • Professor, Counseling/Counseling Psychology, Division of Psychology in Education, Arizona State University, 2004-2008
  • Interim Director, Division of Psychology in Education, Arizona State University, 2004-2004
  • Associate Professor, Counseling/Counseling Psychology, Division of Psychology in Education, Arizona State University, 1996-2004
  • Associate Director, Division of Psychology in Education, Arizona State University, 2003-2003
  • Co-Program Coordinator, Masters in Counseling Program, Arizona State University, 1997-1999
  • Assistant Professor, Divion of Psychology in Education, Arizona State University, 1992-1996
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education, Northern Illinois University, 1988-1991
  • Acting Assistant Dean, Graduate School, Northern Illinois University, 1989-1990
  • Assessment Specialist, Student Assessment Section, Illinois State Board of Education, 1987-1988
  • Program Evaluator III, Program Evaluation and Assessment Section, Illinois State Board of Education, 1984-1987

Activities & Honors

  • Editorial Board Member, American Journal of Evaluation, 2003-present
  • Reviewer, American Journal of Evaluation, 2002-present
  • Editorial Board Member, New Directions for Program Evaluation, 2001-present
  • Reviewer, Review of Educational Research, 1995-present
  • Associate Dean for Research and Research Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2011-2014

Research Statement

Recent scholarly publications have primarily focused on the importance of culture/cultural context in educational assessment, program evaluation and computer based instruction and assessment. Have also served as a program evaluation and testing consultant to the federal government, state departments of education, school districts, universities, foundations, and regional educational laboratories as well as internationally in New Zealand and Ireland.

Grants

  • Principal Investigator, Support the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Research's Inaugural Conference, The Annie Casey Foundation, 2013-2013

Select Publications

  • Hood, S., Hopson, R. Evaluation roots reconsidered: Asa Hilliard, a fallen hero in the Nobody Knows Project, and African Educational Excellence. Review of Educational Research, 78, 410-426.
  • Gilbert, J., Arbuthnot, K., Hood, S., Grant, M., McMillian, Y., Williams, P., al, e. Teaching algebra using culturally relevant vrtual instructors. The International Journal of Virtual Reality, 7(1), 21-30.
  • Hood, S., Hopson, R., Frierson, H. The role of culture and cultural context: A mandate for inclusion, the discovery of truth and understanding in evaluative theory and practice. InfoAge Publishing.
  • Hood, S. Culturally responsive evaluation. Encyclopedia of evaluation. Sage Publications: Thousand Oaks, CA.
  • Hood, S., Bennet, M. African Americans in higher education. Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO: Santa Barbara, CA.
  • Hood, S. Nobody knows my name: In praise of African American evaluators who were responsive. New Directions for Evaluation, 92, 31-43.
  • Gilbert, J., Arbuthnot, K., Hood, S., Grant, M., McMillian, Y., Williams, P., al, e. Teaching algebra using culturally relevant virtual instructors. International Journal of Virtual Reality, 7(1), 21-30.
  • Hood, S. (2014). How will we know it when we see it? A critical friend perspective of the GEDI Program and its legacy in evaluation. . New Directions for Evaluation: San Francisco CA/ Jossey-Bass, USA.
  • Frazier-Anderson, P., Hood, S., Hopson, R. (2012). Preliminary considerations of an African American culturally responsive evaluation system. Qualitative research: An introduction to methods and designs. Jossey-Bass Publishers: San Francisco, CA.
  • Frierson, H., Hood, S., Hughes, G., Thomas, V. (2010). A guide to conducting culturally responsive evaluation. National Science Foundation. The 2010 User-Friendly Handbook for Project Evaluation. National Science Foundation, Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Research, Evaluation, and C.
  • Hood, S. (2009). Evaluation for and by Navajos: A Narrative Case of the Irrelevance of Globalization. International Handbook of Educational Evaluation. Sage Publishing Company.
  • Gilbert, J., Eugene, W., Arbuthnot, K., Hood, S., Grant, M., West, M., Swanier, C. (2009). Culturally Relevant Game Design: A Case Study for Designing Interactive Algebra Lessons for Urban Youth. i-manager’s Journal of Educational Technology, 5(3), pp. 54-60.
  • Gilbert, J., Arbuthnot, K., Hood, S., Grant, M., McMillian, Y., Williams, P., al, e. (2008). Teaching algebra using culturally relevant virtual instructors. The International Journal of Virtual Reality, 7(1), 21-30.
  • Hood, S., Hopson, R. (2008). Evaluation roots reconsidered: Asa Hilliard, a fallen hero in the Nobody knows project, and African educational excellence. Review of Educational Research, 78, 410-426.

In The News

Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment opens with international conference in Chicago

Jul. 3, 2013

The Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) held its inaugural conference in April, and it did what any innovative and ground-breaking first conference should do. In addition to hosting 265 conference registrants and offering 59 breakout sessions and 120 paper, roundtable, and symposium sessions, the conference also examined the past, celebrated its present, and looked to the future to consider what its next uncharted steps might be. Read more...